Weekly Feature



2018-01-17 / Sports

Book becomes fifth NT player to reach 1,000 points

Sports Reporter
TAYLOR NIGRELLI


North Tonawanda senior Trevor Book inches closer to 1,000 career points with a first-half lay-up in Tuesday’s win over Lew-Port. Book reached the milestone in the third quarter, becoming just the fifth player in program history to do so. 
Photo by Jake French North Tonawanda senior Trevor Book inches closer to 1,000 career points with a first-half lay-up in Tuesday’s win over Lew-Port. Book reached the milestone in the third quarter, becoming just the fifth player in program history to do so. Photo by Jake French Ryan Mountain tried to keep it a secret. The North Tonawanda coach didn’t tell his team that its top scorer was nearing 1,000 career points. He didn’t tell them Trevor Book was just 18 points shy of the milestone, heading into last Tuesday’s game against Lew-Port. He didn’t let them know that the three men who addressed the team before the game were the three living members of the program’s 1,000-point club.

In fact, he didn’t let it slip until the end of his halftime speech, after Book scored 14 in the first half to pull within four.

“He scored 14 of that in the first half. I didn’t say anything to anyone,” Mountain said. “Three of our living 1,000-point scorers were there and addressed the team prior to the game. We didn’t mention that Trevor was close until half. The last thing

I said to them before we went back out there was that the three guys who talked to them were the three 1,000-point scorers and that Trevor only needs four points to join that fraternity.”

With about five minutes left in the third quarter, Book caught the ball in the paint having already gotten to 998, but was double-teamed. He passed it out to Kyle McNeill on the perimeter, who drew one of the defenders out and then passed it back. Book put a move on the guy defending him and made a layup. The game stopped briefly as Book was given a commemorative ball and took some pictures with his teammates. Then the game resumed and Book helped lead his team to a win to move to 8-2 on the season.

Book has been efficient. He’s the fifth player in program history to get to 1,000 points, but he did it in just 54 games. He came up at the end of his freshman year, but did not play in the sectional playoffs. He started right away as a sophomore, scoring 15.3 points per game and earning himself an interesting moniker.


Trevor Book (11) gets a round of applause at center court after reaching his milestone. His teammates and coaches come out on the court to congratulate him. 
Photo by Jake French Trevor Book (11) gets a round of applause at center court after reaching his milestone. His teammates and coaches come out on the court to congratulate him. Photo by Jake French “I nicknamed him The Assassin his freshman year because of his range and accuracy shooting the ball,” Mountain said. “The nickname fit. He was an elite, all-around scorer. He can attack the opposing basket anywhere. He and everywhere. He can score off screens, off the dribble, posting up, above the rim. Our opponents may do a good job containing him, but he still averages 26 points per game. He gets points off offensive rebounds and steals, too.

Book continued to grow his junior year, scoring 18.3 points per game to lead the team to a Class A sectional title. This year, he’s taken another leap, averaging 26.1 points per contest. He’s averaged just under 19 points per game for his career. He’s also shooting 52 percent from the field and 45 percent from three-point range. He’s averaging 7.8 rebounds and 3.2 assists while pitching in 22 steals and 14 blocks.”

“He just has that Larry Bird and Michael Jordan competitive fire that he hates to lose,” Mountain said. “He’s all about the team succeeding. He has toughness and understands the value of investing in the team and serving team leadership.”

The team is on a similar path as it was last season when it won its first sectional title in more than a half-century. The Lumberjacks are again one of the top teams in the Niagara-Frontier League.

“The defense is always the backbone of our program,” Mountain said. “We’re only allowing 47 points per game this year. We have eight wins and we’re allowing 42 points in those games. Lockport put up 67 on us and Niagara Falls went off and got 73. Our team is understanding the value of defense first. Offensively, we have been sharing the ball and have 16 assists per game. We’re shooting 45 percent as a team. We’re scoring 65 points per game, 20 of those come from our defense — which is holding the opposing team to 34 percent shooting.”

The team took on Grand Island Tuesday in a game that did not end by press time. They’ll then play Starpoint Friday and Kenmore East next Tuesday.

email: tnigrelli@beenews.com

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