Weekly Feature



2018-05-16 / Front Page

City of Tonawanda resident receives award

by ANNA DEROSA Editor


Donald Kreger, left, a retired investigator with the New York State University Police at the University at Buffalo, holds his Career Achievement Award next to state Assemblyman Sean Ryan in Albany. Donald Kreger, left, a retired investigator with the New York State University Police at the University at Buffalo, holds his Career Achievement Award next to state Assemblyman Sean Ryan in Albany. From uniforms to what the position entails, a lot has changed in terms of a university police officer’s role throughout the years.

City of Tonawanda resident Donald Kreger, a retired investigator with the New York State University Police at the University at Buffalo, helped make changes possible, which are now significant to the role.

From 1982 to 2010, Kreger was employed with UB. He was born in North Tonawanda, and worked at colleges and universities throughout the state for a total of 35 years.

In honor of his work, Kreger recently received the Career Achievement Award from the Police Benevolent Association of New York State.

He was presented the award in Albany on the current union’s lobby day on May 1.

Kreger was recognized for his role in helping persuade the state Legislature and former Gov. George Pataki to pass legislation granting SUNY officers full police officer status in 1999.

The University Police legislation was signed into law by Pataki in 1996, and then SUNY Public Safety officially became the New York State University Police in 1999.

“I was pretty excited about it. I was really grateful because this took about seven years of my life where I was doing a lot of lobbying locally and in Albany,” Kreger said.

Before his promotion to investigator in 2003, Kreger was a patrol officer at Geneseo and then the University at Buffalo.

According to Kreger, his duties included general crime prevention patrols; traffic control; investigation of criminal, traffic, safety and service complaints; and the enforcement of state, local, and university laws, rules and regulations.

“The significance of this award is not that I got it, especially because I’ve been out of the union and retired. The significance is that it marks the importance of change in status for university police in New York and the ability for them to properly perform their jobs,” Kreger said.

Kreger served as a campus union representative at both Geneseo and UB under American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, Council 82. Under his union leadership, officers at UB were armed in 1987 for the first time since the early 1970s, according to Kreger.

He was also the statewide president for the New York State University Police from 1990 to 1999, representing 500 State University Police officers, investigators and civilian dispatchers at New York’s 29 state-operated campuses.

“I think it made me feel good that I was working not only to make working conditions better for university police officers but also to do something that made campuses safer,” Kreger said.

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